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Three Musical Fables

The Cambridge Singers | The King’s Singers | City of London Sinfonia
Richard Hickox (conductor) | John Rutter (conductor)

CD:

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Category: Tags: , , , CSCD 513

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Description

A perfect Christmas present for music-loving children, this album brings together three musical fables written by John Rutter.

The Reluctant Dragon and The Wind in the Willows, both adapted by David Grant from Kenneth Grahame stories, were commissioned for Christmas concerts given by The King’s Singers. Written by Rutter himself, the story of Brother Heinrich’s Christmas is built around the legend that the carol In dulci jubilo was first sung by angels who miraculously appeared to the medieval monk Heinrich Suso one Christmas Eve.

With Richard Baker and Brian Kay (narrators).

Track list

  1. The Wind in the Willows: Introduction
  2. The Wind in the Willows: Rat and Mole meet – A life on the river
  3. The Wind in the Willows: Scene at Badger's house
  4. The Wind in the Willows: Toad's car
  5. The Wind in the Willows: Court scene
  6. The Wind in the Willows: Toad in gaol – Let me tickle your fancy
  7. The Wind in the Willows: Toad's song – I've got style
  8. The Wind in the Willows: The recapture of Toad Hall – Let's wallop a weasel
  9. The Wind in the Willows: The banquet at Toad Hall
  10. The Wind in the Willows: Finale – Home is a special kind of feeling
  11. Brother Heinrich's Christmas: Introduction
  12. Brother Heinrich's Christmas: Sigismund sings in the abbey choir
  13. Brother Heinrich's Christmas: Sigismund is dismissed
  14. Brother Heinrich's Christmas: Brother Heinrich and the new carol
  15. Brother Heinrich's Christmas: The angels appear on Christmas Eve
  16. Brother Heinrich's Christmas: Brother Heinrich writes down the Angel's carol
  17. Brother Heinrich's Christmas: Christmas morning
  18. Brother Heinrich's Christmas: The Angels' Carol and Christmas dinner
  19. The Reluctant Dragon: Introduction
  20. The Reluctant Dragon: The boy visits the dragon's cave
  21. The Reluctant Dragon: The villagers and St George arrive
  22. The Reluctant Dragon: Trio – I say, old boy
  23. The Reluctant Dragon: Planning the tournament – First he waves his spear around
  24. The Reluctant Dragon: The tournament
  25. The Reluctant Dragon: Banquet fugue
  26. The Reluctant Dragon – Let's begin again

“I predict that this album will become part of our family Christmas”
Cross Rhythms

“Three musical fables that were written with children and adults in mind. The Reluctant Dragon, The Wind in the Willows, and Brother Heinrich’s Christmas are the magic spark of Christmas on this imaginative release”
AllMusic

“This is an enchanting recording, suitable for all children from ages 3 to 90!” Church Music Quarterly

“Written ‘with children and eavesdropping adults especially in mind’, The Reluctant Dragon and The Wind in the Willows were drawn by David Grant from Kenneth Grahame stories; Brother Heinrich’s Christmas was written for a Christmas TV broadcast from Salisbury Cathedral, and this story is John Rutter’s own.  This is an enchanting recording, suitable for all children from ages 3 to 90!  It shows us yet again the genius of the composer, who clearly works not only with his head, but also with his big, warm heart.”
Church Music Quarterly

“John Rutter’s name is readily associated with carols, and Brother Heinrich’s Christmas is a musical narrative with choir, telling the story of how one of the most famous of all carols was introduced late at night by the angels to Brother Heinrich, just in time for it to be included in the monk’s Christmas Day service.  Brother Heinrich also has a donkey who is a member of the monastery choir, even though he can only sing two notes; but thereby hangs the tale.  It is all highly ingenious (Brian Kay has just the right avuncular approach) but engagingly presented, and should appeal to young listeners who have enjoyed Howard Blake’s The Snowman.”
Church Music Quarterly

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